E.g., 09/28/2021
E.g., 09/28/2021
336search results
The purpose of a 401(k) is to provide retirement income, so the last thing you ever want to do is access that money while you're still working. But if times get tough and you grow desperate for cash, you might be tempted to tap that account early and access the money that's technically yours.
  | Financial Wellness

70 Percent of 401(k) Plans Offer This Key Feature

We're told we're supposed to save diligently for retirement during our working years, and socking away funds in a 401(k) is a great way to do so. If your employer offers a 401(k) plan, you can consider yourself lucky. And if that 401(k) comes with a Roth savings option, consider yourself even luckier.
  | Financial Wellness

How to manage debt (and still have fun)

Yes, it’s true: spending money is fun. Buying a new TV, treating yourself to a massage, taking a vacation—all of these things can feel, well, awesome. Especially when you’re rewarding yourself for the hard work you do. But going into debt to be good to yourself? That takes a little of the shine off the experience, doesn’t it? Fortunately, it’s possible to enjoy life and manage debt, at the same time!
Our goal is to help people think differently about retirement. And on a nice day in the park, we did just that with an #OrangeAid stand, two crates of oranges, 20 gallons of juice, and a fifth-grader named Savannah who happens to be thinking about retirement already.
  | Financial Decisions

4 Ways to Prepare for a Longer Retirement

Americans are living longer these days. That's a positive thing in theory, but from a retirement-planning standpoint, it can be challenging. After all, there's a difference between needing your retirement savings to last 20 years versus 30 years or more.
After a lifetime of hard work, you’ve earned your retirement—and all the benefits that come with it, including Social Security. But if you’re retiring before your full retirement age and have other sources of retirement income, you may want to put off applying for your Social Security benefits. Here’s why.

Pages